Featured Work
  • Dear France, We're So Over
  • The Nation columnist mourns the loss of love for France, the country she admired for its welfare programs, national health service, and government-funded childcare. The DSK affair, however, and the reactions it drew in France, have soured the relationship.

  • Who's Afraid of Elizabeth Warren?
  • The takeaway from this afternoon's hearing on TARP, Financial Services and Bailouts? Republicans don't like the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, and they really don't like its leader, Elizabeth Warren.

  • Darker Convergence
  • Prepared remarks by Scott Horton, "Alarm and Hope 2011: Conference on the Ninetieth Birthday of Andrei Dmitrievich Sakharov," Moscow, May 21, 2011.

  • Six Questions for Anatol Lieven
  • Journalist turned foreign-affairs analyst Anatol Lieven has Pakistan in his bones. Descended from civil servants and officers in British India, he cut his journalistic teeth in the subcontinent. I put six questions to Lieven about his new book, Pakistan: A Hard Country.

  • How Not to Declare a War
  • The Obama administration's legal rationale for bombing Libya suggests that while George W. Bush may be gone, the imperial presidency isn't.

  • Remembering Juliano Mer-Khamis
  • Juliano Mer-Khamis, the co-founder of Freedom Theatre in Jenin Refugee Camp, was shot dead on April 4, 2011. Juliano represented the best of what it means to be Palestinian and to be Jewish.

  • Race-Baiting Is Different From Racism
  • When ColorOfChange.org campaigned against conservative provocateur Andrew Breitbart's presence on Huffington Post, it was for what he's done, not what he feels. Co-author James Rucker.

  • Jim Messina, Obama's Enforcer
  • The president's re-election campaign manager, Jim Messina, a longtime aide to Montana Senator Max Baucus who entered Obamaworld in June 2008 as the campaign's chief of staff, has alienated grassroots constituencies with his hardball tactics.

  • The Supreme Court Stands Tall for Misbehaving Prosecutors
  • Violations of Brady are epidemic, and they often produce the conviction of innocent defendants, allowing the real culprits to go free. And the courts that allow such prosecutorial misconduct effectively tell the prosecutors they can get away with it.

  • The Dangerous US Game in Yemen
  • The United States has unintentionally helped weaken Yemeni President Saleh's regime. For years, US policy neglected Yemen's civil society, focusing instead on hunting down terrorists. These operations caused the deaths of dozens of civilians, fuelling popular anger against Saleh.

  • Michelle Rhee's Cheating Scandal
  • The education reform superstar presided over substantial test score irregularities during her term as D.C. schools chancellor, an investigation has found — but Dana Goldstein says the findings are no surprise.

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